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Sangeeta N. Bhatia SM '93, PhD '97

John J. and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2005 - present

John J. and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2005 - present

Sangeeta N. Bhatia SM ’93, PhD ’97
John J. and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2005 - present
Director, Laboratory for Multiscale Regenerative Technologies
Associate Member, Broad Institute
Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, 2008 - present

Sangeeta Bhatia is the John J. and Dorothy Wilson professor of health sciences and technology and electrical engineering and computer science at MIT. A member of the MIT faculty since 2005, her work focuses on tissue repair and regeneration using micro- and nanotechnology, with a specific focus on developing improved cellular therapies for liver disease and cancer nanotechnology. Among her several advanced degrees, Professor Bhatia earned an SM in mechanical engineering and a PhD in medical engineering from MIT. Prior to serving on MIT’s faculty, she was a member of the Bioengineering Department at the University of California at San Diego for six years; she currently holds a number of patents for both clinical and biotechnological applications of engineering principles. Her many awards include the David and Lucile Packard Fellowship for being one of the nation’s “most promising young professors in science and engineering” (1999 to 2004) and the MIT Technology Review TR100 Young Innovators Award (2003).

Highlights of this interview include:

  • The influence of her highly accomplished parents on her academic path.
  • How culture shock as an MIT graduate student led her to rethink her priorities and create a work-life balance she cherishes today.
  • Why she “fell in love” with the human liver.
  • Her role as a mentor in encouraging young women to consider science as a career.
  • Her passion for putting innovative medical theories into real-world practice for patients.
  • MIT’s advancements in diversity, particularly increased women on the faculty.
  • How, as a faculty member, she’s become energized by the “drinking from the fire hose” environment of MIT.
  • The one lesson she wished someone had told her when she was an MIT graduate student.

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