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Jerome I. Friedman

Nobel Laureate in Physics

Institute Professor, emeritus 

Nobel Laureate in Physics

Institute Professor, emeritus 

Jerome I. Friedman
Nobel laureate in Physics, 1990
Institute Professor, emeritus
Professor of Physics, emeritus

Jerome Friedman is an Institute Professor of physics emeritus who served as the director of the Laboratory for Nuclear Science and as the head of the Department of Physics at MIT. He, Henry Kendall, and Richard E. Taylor shared first the W.H.K. Panofsky Prize in 1989 and then the Nobel prize in Physics in 1990 for their “pioneering investigations concerning deep inelastic scattering of electrons on protons and bound neutrons, which have been of essential importance for the development of the quark model in particle physics”. Professor Friedman currently serves as vice chairman of the Board of Governors of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology.

Highlights of this interview include:

  • Passion for the arts from a young age; efforts to promote arts programs at MIT.
  • Research that led to the discovery of elementary particles called quarks.
  • Surprise and excitement of winning the Nobel prize in Physics in 1990.
  • Efforts to increase minority and gender equality among MIT students and faculty.

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